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«NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES Sunset Hills Historic District Greensboro, Guilford County, GF8233, Listed 1/14/2013 Nomination by Jennifer ...»

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Windows are one-over-one replacements and soffits have been covered in vinyl. The Somers bought the property in 1952, but do not appear in the city directory at this address until 1956. He worked as a buyer for Sears.

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A one-story, one-bay, front-gabled, vinyl-sided garage stands in the rear yard.

Martha and Guy Hill House 2410 Madison Avenue ca. 1956 Contributing Building The one-story, five-bay, side-gabled, brick Ranch house with a dentil cornice is composed of two blocks with the western section positioned slightly higher than the eastern block. Decorative metal posts support the engaged porch that spans the façade of the dwelling’s eastern half. All windows are vinyl replacements. A corbelled chimney rises from the rear roof slope. The Hills bought the property in 1952, but do not appear at this address until the 1957 city directory. He was a salesman for Robert Bruce Inc.

In 1957 they sold the house to College Park Baptist Church, which owned it until 1976.

Garage 2410 Madison Avenue ca. 2000 Noncontributing Building The one-story, one-bay, front-gabled, vinyl-sided garage stands in the rear yard.

Anna W. and Sidney B. Wood House 2411 Madison Avenue ca. 1956 Contributing Building The one-story, three-bay, cross-gabled, brick Ranch house displays an off-center, front-facing gable with a three-part picture window. The recessed pilastered entry with a vinyl-sheathed reveal is just west of the front-facing gable. Windows throughout are eight-over-eight and six-over-six. A brick chimney straddles the roof ridge. The Woods bought the property in 1953, but do not appear at this address until the 1957 city directory. He was department manager for Strong Tire Service. They sold the house in 1965.

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The one-story, four-bay, side-gabled, brick Ranch house includes a slightly-recessed entry and three-part picture windows on its façade. Other windows are one-over-one. A modern deck fronts the west half of the façade and a brick chimney rises from the east gable end. Behethland and Hardy Root bought the property in 1952, but do not appear at this address until the 1956 city directory. He worked for the Internal Revenue Service as an auditor. They sold the house in 1974.

Mary and Glenn Gordon House2414 Madison Avenueca. 1960Contributing Building

The side-gabled, three-bay, brick Split-Level includes a stylized classical portico supported by wood posts. Windows are six-over-six vinyl replacements. Brick chimneys occupy the rear roof slope and the east gable end where a side-gabled, vinyl-clad sunroom addition is located. The Gordons bought the property in 1960 and first appear at this address in the 1960 city directory. He was an estimator for J. D.

Wilkins Company. They sold the house in 1979.

Dorothy and James Simmons House2415 Madison Avenueca. 1956Contributing Building

The austere, one-story, four-bay, cross-gabled, brick Minimal Traditional-style house displays a frontfacing, off center gable on the west end of its façade. A recessed entry is just to the west of the front gable. All windows are one-over-one vinyl replacements. The basement contains a garage. The Simmons bought the property in 1953, but do not appear at this address until the 1957 city directory. He was a building contractor. Dorothy Simmons now owns the house.

Margaret and James Truitt House2416 Madison Avenueca. 1954Contributing Building

The one-story, four-bay, side-gabled, brick Ranch house displays an off-center, front-facing gable pierced by a circular wood vent. The recessed entry with vinyl-clad reveal is located beneath the front gable. All windows are one-over-one replacements. A brick chimney occupies the west gable end, forward of the roof ridge. The Truitts bought the property in 1953 and first appear at this address in the 1955 city directory. James Truitt was assistant manager for Bales and Truitt, a repair company. They NPS Form 10-900 OMB Approval No. 1024-0018 (8-86) sold the house in 1967.

Ginn-Ekstrom House 2417 Madison Avenue ca. 1956 Contributing Building The one-story, seven-bay, side-gabled, brick Ranch house is composed of two blocks: the western section sits slightly low and is two bays wide. A brick chimney rises from the rear roof slope between the two blocks. A recessed porch with wood posts with necking support the porch as it shelters a multilight door and a three-part picture window. Windows throughout are eight-over-eight and six-over-six.

The Ginns bought the property in 1953, but do not appear at this address until the 1957 city directory.

He was a psychiatrist at the county health department. In 1957 they sold the house to Doris and David Ekstrom. Doris Ekstrom was a salesperson for Ellis Stone and he worked for Garbic Color and Chemical. In 1974 the house transferred to Doris Ekstrom and she owned it until 1994.

West Market Street Lillian and Jesse N. Coe House 1703 West Market Street ca. 1927 Contributing Building The one-and-a-half-story, three-bay, front-gabled, stone Craftsman bungalow displays knee braches and exposed rafter ends. A stuccoed and half-timbered, front-gabled porch with stone square supports extends along a portion of the façade and displays a solid stone balustrade. A wood pergola that is supported by the same stone piers seen on the porch shades the west end of the façade. A multi-light door with cut-glass sidelights and all of the six-over-six windows are topped by stone flat arches and keystones. The principal front gable displays the same stucco and half-timbering as the front-gable porch. Small side-gabled bays extend from the east and west elevations. Stone chimneys rise from the dwelling's interior. The Coes bought the property in July 1927 and first appear at this address in the 1928 city directory. Mr. Coe was president of J. N. Coe and Company and vice-president of Greensboro Furniture Company and treasurer of Johnson’s Purifying Company. They sold the house in August 1929.





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A flat-roofed, stone garage with a pent metal roof on its façade stands in the rear yard.

Lessie and Cyrus R. Wharton House 1704 West Market Street ca. 1926 Contributing Building The two-and-a-half-story, five-bay, side-gabled, brick Colonial Revival-style dwelling displays a dentiled cornice and cornice returns. A front-gabled portico with returns and dentils supported by Tuscan columns and plain pilasters shelters a brick stoop with concrete edging. The tongue-and- groove underside is curved. A paneled reveal is flanks a paneled wood and multi-light door with a fanlight and leaded-glass sidelights above a wood panel. The porch extends to the east to form a patio that fronts an east side wing. Keystones with flanking flat arches top the six-over-six windows. Three weatherboardsheathed dormers with fanlight upper sash and gable returns rest on the front roof slope. A brick chimney on the east elevation is partially exterior and forward of the roof ridge; an interior chimney rises from the rear roof slope on the west side of the house. A one-story, flat- roofed, brick sunroom wing with a dentiled cornice occupies the east elevation. A wood Chippendale balustrade tops the wing.

A nearly identical wing occupies the west elevation. Some windows on the wings are replacements. The Whartons bought the property from A. K. Moore Realty in September 1927 and first appear at this address in the 1928 city directory. He was an attorney in the firm Brooks, Parker, Smith, and Wharton.

The Whartons owned the house until 1967.

Garage 1704 West Market Street ca. 1926 Contributing Building A one-story, side-gabled, weatherboard garage stands in the rear yard.

Marjorie and Frederick E. Harllee House 1705 West Market Street ca. 1927 Contributing Building The grand two-and-a-half-story, four-bay, hip-roofed, brick and stucco Tudor Revival house has halftimbering on its upper story and its front-facing gables of varying heights. The easternmost front gable extends to the east to shelter a porch with Tudor arch openings. The central, front-gable, two-story bay NPS Form 10-900 OMB Approval No. 1024-0018 (8-86) projects forward and features a Tudor arch forward of the Tudor-style, vertical wood door with multiple upper lights set in a square pattern. A brick and concrete patio extends along the east half of the facade.

A hip-roofed dormer with a diamond muntin pattern window rests on the front roof ridge. Other windows are casement with diamond muntin patterns or eight-light with four-light transoms or twentyfour light with six-light transoms. An interior chimney rises from the east side of the dwelling. The Harllees bought the property August 1927 and first appear at this address in the 1928 city directory. Mr.

Harllee was vice-president and manager of Meyer’s Company, which owned Meyer’s Department Store.

The Harllees owned the house until 1948.

Architect Lorenzo Winslow (1892-1976), a native of High Point, designed the house. Winslow, who earned a degree in engineering and architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, took a position at the A. K. Moore Realty Company, developer of Sunset Hills, in 1924. Winslow's role was to assist homeowners in architectural design and engineering, with the help of James R. Hollowell, a recent engineering graduate from Clemson. The team of Winslow and Hollowell probably designed many of the European and Early American-inspired houses in Sunset Hills. In 1927, Winslow established his own firm. (from Benjamin Briggs, "Lorenzo S. Winslow," North Carolina Architects & Builders: A Biographical Dictionary, Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, North Carolina State University Libraries) Garage 1705 West Market Street ca. 1927 Contributing Building The two-story, side-gabled, two-bay brick garage with a front-facing, central gable sheathed in stucco and half-timbering stands in the rear yard. Windows are six-over-one. A wood stair is located on the west side.

House 1706 West Market Street ca. 1975 Noncontributing Building The two-story, three-bay, side-gabled with returns, brick, Colonial Revival-style house has a one-bay, two-story, front-gabled projection with brick quoins and returns. Fluted pilasters with a dentiled cornice shelters a paneled wood door with leaded glass transom and half-glazed and paneled sidelights. A Palladian window with a half-circle fanlight is positioned above the entry. Multi-light sidelights flank the larger window. Brick steps lead to the brick stoop. Synthetic siding sheathes the gable ends. The NPS Form 10-900 OMB Approval No. 1024-0018 (8-86) replacement twelve-over-twelve windows on the first floor are topped by smooth, light-colored keystones with smooth, light-colored radiating lintels; upper windows are eight-over- twelve replacements. A side-gabled one-and-a-half-story brick garage with returns is attached to the west elevation and is fronted by a wood pergola supported by columns. A triangular louvered wood vent pierces the upper side gable. A brick wall with a wood Chippendale gate extends from the southwest corner of the garage to the west.

Frances W. and Marvin G. King House1708 West Market Streetca. 1950Contributing Building

The one-and-a-half-story, three-bay, side-gabled, brick, Minimal Traditional dwelling displays a wide, off-center, projecting front-gable pierced by a pair of small one-over-one window. Brick steps flanked by metal balustrades lead to a brick stoop forward of a plain reveal. The door of vertical wood is pierced by lights on its upper half. A front-gabled dormer with synthetic siding rests on the front roof slope and contains a pair of one-over-one windows. Other windows are two-over-two with metal awnings. A brick chimney occupies the east gable end, just forward of a brick, shed-roofed side wing with synthetic siding in its upper façade. A side-gabled, open carport with brick supports is attached to the west elevation. The Kings bought the property in 1950 and first appear at this address in that year’s city directory. Marvin King was a knitter for Mock, Judson, Voehringer Company. The King family owned the house until 2003.

Garage 1708 West Market Street ca. 1950 Contributing Building A one-story, front-gabled, weatherboard garage stands in the rear yard.

Kathleen and P. Lester Hawks House 1709 West Market Street ca. 1925 Contributing Building The two-and-a-half-story, five-bay, side-gabled with returns, brick Colonial Revival house presents a central, one-story, front-gabled portico with a vaulted soffit and square fluted posts and pilasters with capitals. The portico shelters a brick stoop and paneled wood door with a semi-elliptical fanlight and NPS Form 10-900 OMB Approval No. 1024-0018 (8-86) multi-light sidelights with paneling below. Flat arches with keystones top the six-over-six windows and exterior brick chimneys stand on the gable ends of the two-story block. Three front-gabled dormers with new sash stand on the front roof slope. A flat-roofed, one-story, brick wing with six- over-six windows occupies the east gable end. The Hawks are the earliest known occupants and appear at this address in the 1926 city directory.

Ruth and Henry Boyles House1710 West Market Streetca. 1935Contributing Building

The two-story, three-bay, truncated hip-roofed, brick Colonial Revival-style house displays modillion blocks along its soffit. A hip-roofed entry porch with modillion blocks and dentils on its cornice is supported with paired slender Tuscan columns and shelters a multi-light door with sidelights. Windows are primarily paired and single six-over-six replacement sash; first floor windows are topped by soldiercourse lintels. An exterior brick chimney occupies the east elevation and protrudes through the roof of a one-story, three-bay, hip-roofed, wood sun porch with modillion blocks and a dentiled cornice. Fluted pilasters with plain caps separate four-over-four windows with two-light transoms and flank the multilight, centered door topped with a three-light transom. A small, one-bay, side-gabled hyphen connects the house to a one-story, front-gabled, brick, two-bay, brick garage with modillion blocks and a small, octagonal, multi-light window near top of the façade. A pyramidal-roofed cupola rests on the roof ridge and a front-gabled brick dormer with modillion blocks rests on the west roof slope. The Boyles family bought the property in March 1935 and first appears at this address in the 1938 city directory. He was a physician. Ruth, a widow, sold the house in 1939.



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