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«AASB Standard AASB 10 August 2011 Consolidated Financial Statements Obtaining a Copy of this Accounting Standard This Standard is available on the ...»

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18 Thus, an investor with decision-making rights shall determine whether it is a principal or an agent. An investor that is an agent in accordance with paragraphs B58–B72 does not control an investee when it exercises decision-making rights delegated to it.

AASB 10 STANDARD Accounting requirements 19 A parent shall prepare consolidated financial statements using uniform accounting policies for like transactions and other events in similar circumstances.

20 Consolidation of an investee shall begin from the date the investor obtains control of the investee and cease when the investor loses control of the investee.

21 Paragraphs B86–B93 set out guidance for the preparation of consolidated financial statements.

Non-controlling interests 22 A parent shall present non-controlling interests in the consolidated statement of financial position within equity, separately from the equity of the owners of the parent.

23 Changes in a parent’s ownership interest in a subsidiary that do not result in the parent losing control of the subsidiary are equity transactions (ie transactions with owners in their capacity as owners).

24 Paragraphs B94–B96 set out guidance for the accounting for noncontrolling interests in consolidated financial statements.

Loss of control 25 If a parent loses control of a subsidiary, the parent:

(a) derecognises the assets and liabilities of the former subsidiary from the consolidated statement of financial position.

(b) recognises any investment retained in the former subsidiary at its fair value when control is lost and subsequently accounts for it and for any amounts owed by or to the former subsidiary in accordance with relevant Standards. That fair value shall be regarded as the fair value on initial recognition of a financial asset in accordance with AASB 9 or, when appropriate, the cost on initial recognition of an investment in an associate or joint venture.

(c) recognises the gain or loss associated with the loss of control attributable to the former controlling interest.

–  –  –

The following terms are defined in AASB 11, AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities, AASB 128 (August 2011) or AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures and are used in this Standard with the meanings specified

in those Standards:

associate • interest in another entity • joint venture • key management personnel • related party • significant influence.

–  –  –

B3 Consideration of the following factors may assist in making that

determination:

(a) the purpose and design of the investee (see paragraphs B5–B8);

(b) what the relevant activities are and how decisions about those activities are made (see paragraphs B11–B13);

(c) whether the rights of the investor give it the current ability to direct the relevant activities (see paragraphs B14–B54);

–  –  –

Purpose and design of an investee B5 When assessing control of an investee, an investor shall consider the purpose and design of the investee in order to identify the relevant activities, how decisions about the relevant activities are made, who has the current ability to direct those activities and who receives returns from those activities.

B6 When an investee’s purpose and design are considered, it may be clear that an investee is controlled by means of equity instruments that give the holder proportionate voting rights, such as ordinary shares in the investee. In this case, in the absence of any additional arrangements that alter decision-making, the assessment of control focuses on which party, if any, is able to exercise voting rights sufficient to determine the investee’s operating and financing policies (see paragraphs B34–B50).

In the most straightforward case, the investor that holds a majority of those voting rights, in the absence of any other factors, controls the investee.

B7 To determine whether an investor controls an investee in more complex cases, it may be necessary to consider some or all of the other factors in paragraph B3.

B8 An investee may be designed so that voting rights are not the dominant factor in deciding who controls the investee, such as when any voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and the relevant activities are directed by means of contractual arrangements. In such cases, an investor’s consideration of the purpose and design of the investee shall also include consideration of the risks to which the investee was designed to be exposed, the risks it was designed to pass on to the parties involved with the investee and whether the investor is exposed to some or all of those risks. Consideration of the risks includes not only the downside risk, but also the potential for upside.

Power B9 To have power over an investee, an investor must have existing rights that give it the current ability to direct the relevant activities. For the purpose of assessing power, only substantive rights and rights that are not protective shall be considered (see paragraphs B22–B28).

B10 The determination about whether an investor has power depends on the relevant activities, the way decisions about the relevant activities are

–  –  –





Relevant activities and direction of relevant activities B11 For many investees, a range of operating and financing activities significantly affect their returns. Examples of activities that, depending on the circumstances, can be relevant activities include, but

are not limited to:

(a) selling and purchasing of goods or services;

–  –  –

(c) selecting, acquiring or disposing of assets;

(d) researching and developing new products or processes; and (e) determining a funding structure or obtaining funding.

B12 Examples of decisions about relevant activities include but are not

limited to:

(a) establishing operating and capital decisions of the investee, including budgets; and (b) appointing and remunerating an investee’s key management personnel or service providers and terminating their services or employment.

B13 In some situations, activities both before and after a particular set of circumstances arises or event occurs may be relevant activities. When two or more investors have the current ability to direct relevant activities and those activities occur at different times, the investors shall determine which investor is able to direct the activities that most significantly affect those returns consistently with the treatment of concurrent decision-making rights (see paragraph 13). The investors shall reconsider this assessment over time if relevant facts or circumstances change.

AASB 10 APPENDIX B Application examples Example 1 Two investors form an investee to develop and market a medical product. One investor is responsible for developing and obtaining regulatory approval of the medical product—that responsibility includes having the unilateral ability to make all decisions relating to the development of the product and to obtaining regulatory approval. Once the regulator has approved the product, the other investor will manufacture and market it—this investor has the unilateral ability to make all decisions about the manufacture and marketing of the project. If all the activities—developing and obtaining regulatory approval as well as manufacturing and marketing of the medical product—are relevant activities, each investor needs to determine whether it is able to direct the activities that most significantly affect the investee’s returns. Accordingly, each investor needs to consider whether developing and obtaining regulatory approval or the manufacturing and marketing of the medical product is the activity that most significantly affects the investee’s returns and whether it is able to direct that activity. In determining which investor has power, the investors would

consider:

(a) the purpose and design of the investee;

(b) the factors that determine the profit margin, revenue and value of the investee as well as the value of the medical product;

(c) the effect on the investee’s returns resulting from each investor’s decision-making authority with respect to the factors in (b); and (d) the investors’ exposure to variability of returns.

In this particular example, the investors would also consider:

(e) the uncertainty of, and effort required in, obtaining regulatory approval (considering the investor’s record of successfully developing and obtaining regulatory approval of medical products); and (f) which investor controls the medical product once the development phase is successful.

AASB 10 APPENDIX B Example 2 An investment vehicle (the investee) is created and financed with a debt instrument held by an investor (the debt investor) and equity instruments held by a number of other investors. The equity tranche is designed to absorb the first losses and to receive any residual return from the investee. One of the equity investors who holds 30 per cent of the equity is also the asset manager. The investee uses its proceeds to purchase a portfolio of financial assets, exposing the investee to the credit risk associated with the possible default of principal and interest payments of the assets. The transaction is marketed to the debt investor as an investment with minimal exposure to the credit risk associated with the possible default of the assets in the portfolio because of the nature of these assets and because the equity tranche is designed to absorb the first losses of the investee. The returns of the investee are significantly affected by the management of the investee’s asset portfolio, which includes decisions about the selection, acquisition and disposal of the assets within portfolio guidelines and the management upon default of any portfolio assets. All those activities are managed by the asset manager until defaults reach a specified proportion of the portfolio value (ie when the value of the portfolio is such that the equity tranche of the investee has been consumed). From that time, a third-party trustee manages the assets according to the instructions of the debt investor. Managing the investee’s asset portfolio is the relevant activity of the investee. The asset manager has the ability to direct the relevant activities until defaulted assets reach the specified proportion of the portfolio value; the debt investor has the ability to direct the relevant activities when the value of defaulted assets surpasses that specified proportion of the portfolio value. The asset manager and the debt investor each need to determine whether they are able to direct the activities that most significantly affect the investee’s returns, including considering the purpose and design of the investee as well as each party’s exposure to variability of returns.

Rights that give an investor power over an investee B14 Power arises from rights. To have power over an investee, an investor must have existing rights that give the investor the current ability to direct the relevant activities. The rights that may give an investor power can differ between investees.

B15 Examples of rights that, either individually or in combination, can give

an investor power include but are not limited to:

–  –  –

(d) rights to direct the investee to enter into, or veto any changes to, transactions for the benefit of the investor; and (e) other rights (such as decision-making rights specified in a management contract) that give the holder the ability to direct the relevant activities.

B16 Generally, when an investee has a range of operating and financing activities that significantly affect the investee’s returns and when substantive decision-making with respect to these activities is required continuously, it will be voting or similar rights that give an investor power, either individually or in combination with other arrangements.

B17 When voting rights cannot have a significant effect on an investee’s returns, such as when voting rights relate to administrative tasks only and contractual arrangements determine the direction of the relevant activities, the investor needs to assess those contractual arrangements in order to determine whether it has rights sufficient to give it power over the investee. To determine whether an investor has rights sufficient to give it power, the investor shall consider the purpose and design of the investee (see paragraphs B5–B8) and the requirements in paragraphs B51–B54 together with paragraphs B18–B20.

B18 In some circumstances it may be difficult to determine whether an investor’s rights are sufficient to give it power over an investee. In such cases, to enable the assessment of power to be made, the investor shall consider evidence of whether it has the practical ability to direct the relevant activities unilaterally. Consideration is given, but is not limited, to the following, which, when considered together with its rights and the indicators in paragraphs B19 and B20, may provide evidence that the investor’s rights are sufficient to give it power over

the investee:

(a) The investor can, without having the contractual right to do so, appoint or approve the investee’s key management personnel who have the ability to direct the relevant activities.

–  –  –

(c) The investor can dominate either the nominations process for electing members of the investee’s governing body or the obtaining of proxies from other holders of voting rights.

(d) The investee’s key management personnel are related parties of the investor (for example, the chief executive officer of the investee and the chief executive officer of the investor are the same person).

(e) The majority of the members of the investee’s governing body are related parties of the investor.



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